Newsletter Issues

2020

Spring 2020 (#138) pdf
Spring 2020 (#138) web

Newsletter Issues

2019

Winter 2019-20 (#137) pdf
Winter 2019-20 (#137) web
Fall 2019 (#136) pdf
Fall 2019 (#136) web
Summer 2019 (#135) pdf
Summer 2019 (#135) web
Spring 2019 (#134) pdf
Spring 2019 (#134) web

Newsletter Issues

2018

Winter 2018-19 (#133) pdf
Winter 2018-19 (#133) web
Fall 2018 (#132) pdf
Fall 2018 (#132) web
Summer 2018 (#131) pdf
Summer 2018 (#131) web
Spring 2018 (#130) pdf
Spring 2018 (#130) web

2017

Winter 2017-18 (#129) pdf
Winter 2017-18 (#129) web
Fall 2017 (#128) pdf
Fall 2017 (#128) web
Summer 2017(#127) pdf
Summer 2017 (#127) web
Spring 2017 (#126) pdf
Spring 2017 (#126) web

2016

Winter 2016 (#125) pdf
Winter 2016 (#125) web
Fall 2016 (#124) pdf
Fall 2016 (#124) web
Summer 2016 (#123) pdf
Summer 2016 (#123) web
Spring 2016 (#122) pdf
Spring 2016 (#122) web

2015

Winter 2015 (#121) pdf
Winter 2015 (#121) web
Fall 2015 (#120) pdf
Fall 2015 (#120) web
Summer 2015 (#119) pdf
Summer 2015 (#119) web
Spring 2015 (#118) pdf
Spring 2015 (#118) web

2014

Winter 2014 (#117) pdf
Winter 2014 (#117) web
Fall 2014 (#116) pdf
Fall 2014 (#116) web
Summer 2014 (#115) pdf
Summer 2014 (#115) web
Spring 2014 (#114) pdf
Spring 2014 (#114) web

2013

Winter 2013-14 (#113) pdf
Winter 2013-14 (#113) web
Fall 2013 (#112) pdf
Fall 2013 (#112) web
Summer 2013 (#111) pdf
Summer 2013 (#111) web
Spring 2013 (#110) pdf
Spring 2013 (#110) web

2012

Winter 2012 - 13 (#109) pdf
Winter 2012 -13 (#109) web
Fall 2012 (#108) pdf
Fall 2012 (#108) web
Summer 2012 (#107)
Spring 2012 (#106)

2011

Winter 2011 - 12 (#105)
Fall 2011 (#104)
Summer 2011 (#103)
Spring 2011 (#102)

2010

Winter 2010 - 11 (#101)
Fall 2010 (#100)
Summer 2010 (#99)
Spring 2010 (#98)

2009

Winter 2009 - 10 (#97)
Fall 2009 (#96)
Summer 2009 (#95)
Spring 2009 (#94)

2008

Winter 2008 - 09 (#93)
Fall 2008 (#92)
Summer 2008 (#91)
Spring 2008 (#90)

2007

Winter 2007 - 08 (#89)
Fall 2007 (#88)
Summer 2007 (#87)
Spring 2007 (#86)

2006

Winter 2006 - 07 (#85)
Fall 2006 (#84)
Summer 2006 (#83)
Spring 2006 (#82)

2005

Winter 2005 - 06 (#81)
Fall 2005 (#80)
Summer 2005 (#79)
Spring 2005 (#78)

2004

Winter 2004 - 05 (#77)
Fall 2004 (#76)
Summer 2004 (#75)
Spring 2004 (#74)

2003

Winter 2003 - 04 (#73)
Fall 2003 (#72)
Summer 2003 (#71)
Spring 2003 (#70)

2002

Winter 2002-03 (#69)
Fall 2002 (#68)
Summer 2002 (#67)
Spring 2002 (#66)

2001

Winter 2001 - 02 (#65)
Fall 2001 (#64)
Summer 2001 (#63)
Spring 2001 (#62)

2000

Winter 2000 - 01 (#61)
Fall 2000 (#60)
Summer 2000 (#59)
Spring 2000 (#58)

1999

Winter 1999 - 00 (#57)
Fall 1999 (#56)
Summer 1999 (#55)
Spring 1999 (#54)

 

Image says Accessability - graphic in grey for Access and green for Ability with dove in grey on newpaper that says Extra! Extra! Read all about it.

 

A Ride on the Merry-Go-Round

by Maria Dibble

Let’s just for a moment think about the points below:

· A program exists that creates hundreds of thousands of jobs for New Yorkers. I imagine most of us would think such an achievement is a remarkable thing.

· A program exists that provides millions of New Yorkers with health care, reducing the number of those without insurance to the lowest margin we’ve likely ever experienced. We’d probably all agree that this is a desirable outcome as well.

· A program exists that allows hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers to avoid placement in nursing homes and other institutions, and remain in their own homes. Most of us would believe that this is a program worth preserving..

Continue reading...

 

NYS Budget: Not Boring This Time!

The big hoopla in the New York State budget this time around concerns Medicaid. As we said last time (AccessAbility Winter 2019-20), it’s mostly much ado about nothing, a little ember fanned into a roaring flame by right-wing media and by Governor Cuomo, who may be attempting an end-run around progressive forces in the legislature. He’s reconvened his famous Medicaid Redesign Team (MRT) to provide cover for the things he already plans to do; you can read about that on page 5.

Consumer Directed Personal Assistance (CDPA) program costs are widely targeted as part of the problem. We cover that separately on page 7...

Continue reading...

 

MRT for You and Me

The MRT is the “Medicaid Redesign Team”. We’ve been hearing about it in the news a lot recently, though by the time you read this, it may, like a fast-moving comet, have flashed by rapidly, raining little chunks of crud from its shiny tail down upon us, and returned to the outer reaches of the solar system, or perhaps just to the wings of the NY political theater, for the second time.

Right wing media pundits have been ranting about “uncontrollable Medicaid spending” in NY for about a year now. More recently, there’s been evidence that at least some relatively influential Democrats in the state legislature are willing to consider raising taxes to pay for what actually is a necessary if rapid increase in Medicaid costs. In fact, some Assembly members have even mentioned reversing New York’s rush toward “Managed Care for All”. Governor Cuomo has said that he does not want to raise general taxes, though he is willing to consider “industry revenues” (taxes on insurance companies or healthcare providers) to address the problem...

Continue reading...

 

 

Spring 2020 Issue No. 138 - web site version

Spring 2020 Issue No. 138 - pdf version