Newsletter Issues

2019

Fall 2019 (#136) pdf
Fall 2019 (#136) web
Summer 2019 (#135) pdf
Summer 2019 (#135) web
Spring 2019 (#134) pdf
Spring 2019 (#134) web

Newsletter Issues

2018

Winter 2018-19 (#133) pdf
Winter 2018-19 (#133) web
Fall 2018 (#132) pdf
Fall 2018 (#132) web
Summer 2018 (#131) pdf
Summer 2018 (#131) web
Spring 2018 (#130) pdf
Spring 2018 (#130) web

2017

Winter 2017-18 (#129) pdf
Winter 2017-18 (#129) web
Fall 2017 (#128) pdf
Fall 2017 (#128) web
Summer 2017(#127) pdf
Summer 2017 (#127) web
Spring 2017 (#126) pdf
Spring 2017 (#126) web

2016

Winter 2016 (#125) pdf
Winter 2016 (#125) web
Fall 2016 (#124) pdf
Fall 2016 (#124) web
Summer 2016 (#123) pdf
Summer 2016 (#123) web
Spring 2016 (#122) pdf
Spring 2016 (#122) web

2015

Winter 2015 (#121) pdf
Winter 2015 (#121) web
Fall 2015 (#120) pdf
Fall 2015 (#120) web
Summer 2015 (#119) pdf
Summer 2015 (#119) web
Spring 2015 (#118) pdf
Spring 2015 (#118) web

2014

Winter 2014 (#117) pdf
Winter 2014 (#117) web
Fall 2014 (#116) pdf
Fall 2014 (#116) web
Summer 2014 (#115) pdf
Summer 2014 (#115) web
Spring 2014 (#114) pdf
Spring 2014 (#114) web

2013

Winter 2013-14 (#113) pdf
Winter 2013-14 (#113) web
Fall 2013 (#112) pdf
Fall 2013 (#112) web
Summer 2013 (#111) pdf
Summer 2013 (#111) web
Spring 2013 (#110) pdf
Spring 2013 (#110) web

2012

Winter 2012 - 13 (#109) pdf
Winter 2012 -13 (#109) web
Fall 2012 (#108) pdf
Fall 2012 (#108) web
Summer 2012 (#107)
Spring 2012 (#106)

2011

Winter 2011 - 12 (#105)
Fall 2011 (#104)
Summer 2011 (#103)
Spring 2011 (#102)

2010

Winter 2010 - 11 (#101)
Fall 2010 (#100)
Summer 2010 (#99)
Spring 2010 (#98)

2009

Winter 2009 - 10 (#97)
Fall 2009 (#96)
Summer 2009 (#95)
Spring 2009 (#94)

2008

Winter 2008 - 09 (#93)
Fall 2008 (#92)
Summer 2008 (#91)
Spring 2008 (#90)

2007

Winter 2007 - 08 (#89)
Fall 2007 (#88)
Summer 2007 (#87)
Spring 2007 (#86)

2006

Winter 2006 - 07 (#85)
Fall 2006 (#84)
Summer 2006 (#83)
Spring 2006 (#82)

2005

Winter 2005 - 06 (#81)
Fall 2005 (#80)
Summer 2005 (#79)
Spring 2005 (#78)

2004

Winter 2004 - 05 (#77)
Fall 2004 (#76)
Summer 2004 (#75)
Spring 2004 (#74)

2003

Winter 2003 - 04 (#73)
Fall 2003 (#72)
Summer 2003 (#71)
Spring 2003 (#70)

2002

Winter 2002-03 (#69)
Fall 2002 (#68)
Summer 2002 (#67)
Spring 2002 (#66)

2001

Winter 2001 - 02 (#65)
Fall 2001 (#64)
Summer 2001 (#63)
Spring 2001 (#62)

2000

Winter 2000 - 01 (#61)
Fall 2000 (#60)
Summer 2000 (#59)
Spring 2000 (#58)

1999

Winter 1999 - 00 (#57)
Fall 1999 (#56)
Summer 1999 (#55)
Spring 1999 (#54)

 

Image says Accessability - graphic in grey for Access and green for Ability with dove in grey on newpaper that says Extra! Extra! Read all about it.

 

Mass Shooting and Mental Health: The Real Story

by Ken Dibble

In the wake of the most recent mass shootings and the ongoing drama of people on the far right and the far left baiting each other over immigration, President Trump made statements that characterized mass shootings as a “mental health problem” and suggested that forced institutionalization might be one of the solutions. He’s actually right on the first point, but he’s dead wrong on the second.

Although Trump clearly does deliberately bait the left on the immigration issue in order to provoke hysterical reactions from progressives to entertain and encourage his far-right base, we don’t think he knows enough, or cares enough, about mental health to try to play these games with that issue. He was likely just repeating a common theme that he’s heard elsewhere...

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The Domino Effect of CDPA Cuts

by Sue Hoyt

There has been all kinds of news and articles in regard to the state Department of Health (DOH) and its devastating proposal to make deep cuts to the CDPA program. It is important to expand on these and get into the “meat” of things, breaking down the impact to show the domino effect these cuts could have.

The first impact will be to the Fiscal Intermediaries (FIs), as it is their administrative costs that are being slashed. Without the proper funding for administration of the program, there is the potential for FIs to have to close. The DOH makes it sound like this will have no impact, as consumers can transition to other FIs. This isn’t as simple as they make it seem; consumers could end up with an FI that is hours away, making communication and assistance more difficult for the consumer and the personal assistant, which affects the ability to properly administer the program, the end result being the consumer not getting proper services...

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And the Beatdown Goes On: OPWDD Fails to Stop Abuse

On June 9, 2019, the New York Times reported that state employee unions are still protecting serious abusers who work in OPWDD group homes, and that the agency has been unable to fire them.

The Times collected disciplinary records from 2015 to 2017 which showed that over a third of employees who “committed abuse-related offenses” in OPWDD facilities were returned to work after the cases were investigated. Despite OPWDD’s claims to be “changing the culture” in its facilities following an abuse scandal that erupted nearly ten years ago, and despite the alleged successes of the state’s Justice Center for the Protection of People with Special Needs, the situation may be worse now than it was eight years ago, prior to the Justice Center’s creation. At that time, a Times review of disciplinary cases found that only a quarter of workers who committed substantiated abuse (including sexual assault) were transferred to other facilities instead of being fired...

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Fall 2019 Issue No. 136 - web site version

Fall 2019 Issue No. 136 - pdf version