Newsletter Issues

2020

Summer 2020 (#139) pdf
Summer 2020 (#139) web
Spring 2020 (#138) pdf
Spring 2020 (#138) web

Newsletter Issues

2019

Winter 2019-20 (#137) pdf
Winter 2019-20 (#137) web
Fall 2019 (#136) pdf
Fall 2019 (#136) web
Summer 2019 (#135) pdf
Summer 2019 (#135) web
Spring 2019 (#134) pdf
Spring 2019 (#134) web

Newsletter Issues

2018

Winter 2018-19 (#133) pdf
Winter 2018-19 (#133) web
Fall 2018 (#132) pdf
Fall 2018 (#132) web
Summer 2018 (#131) pdf
Summer 2018 (#131) web
Spring 2018 (#130) pdf
Spring 2018 (#130) web

2017

Winter 2017-18 (#129) pdf
Winter 2017-18 (#129) web
Fall 2017 (#128) pdf
Fall 2017 (#128) web
Summer 2017(#127) pdf
Summer 2017 (#127) web
Spring 2017 (#126) pdf
Spring 2017 (#126) web

2016

Winter 2016 (#125) pdf
Winter 2016 (#125) web
Fall 2016 (#124) pdf
Fall 2016 (#124) web
Summer 2016 (#123) pdf
Summer 2016 (#123) web
Spring 2016 (#122) pdf
Spring 2016 (#122) web

2015

Winter 2015 (#121) pdf
Winter 2015 (#121) web
Fall 2015 (#120) pdf
Fall 2015 (#120) web
Summer 2015 (#119) pdf
Summer 2015 (#119) web
Spring 2015 (#118) pdf
Spring 2015 (#118) web

2014

Winter 2014 (#117) pdf
Winter 2014 (#117) web
Fall 2014 (#116) pdf
Fall 2014 (#116) web
Summer 2014 (#115) pdf
Summer 2014 (#115) web
Spring 2014 (#114) pdf
Spring 2014 (#114) web

2013

Winter 2013-14 (#113) pdf
Winter 2013-14 (#113) web
Fall 2013 (#112) pdf
Fall 2013 (#112) web
Summer 2013 (#111) pdf
Summer 2013 (#111) web
Spring 2013 (#110) pdf
Spring 2013 (#110) web

2012

Winter 2012 - 13 (#109) pdf
Winter 2012 -13 (#109) web
Fall 2012 (#108) pdf
Fall 2012 (#108) web
Summer 2012 (#107)
Spring 2012 (#106)

2011

Winter 2011 - 12 (#105)
Fall 2011 (#104)
Summer 2011 (#103)
Spring 2011 (#102)

2010

Winter 2010 - 11 (#101)
Fall 2010 (#100)
Summer 2010 (#99)
Spring 2010 (#98)

2009

Winter 2009 - 10 (#97)
Fall 2009 (#96)
Summer 2009 (#95)
Spring 2009 (#94)

2008

Winter 2008 - 09 (#93)
Fall 2008 (#92)
Summer 2008 (#91)
Spring 2008 (#90)

2007

Winter 2007 - 08 (#89)
Fall 2007 (#88)
Summer 2007 (#87)
Spring 2007 (#86)

2006

Winter 2006 - 07 (#85)
Fall 2006 (#84)
Summer 2006 (#83)
Spring 2006 (#82)

2005

Winter 2005 - 06 (#81)
Fall 2005 (#80)
Summer 2005 (#79)
Spring 2005 (#78)

2004

Winter 2004 - 05 (#77)
Fall 2004 (#76)
Summer 2004 (#75)
Spring 2004 (#74)

2003

Winter 2003 - 04 (#73)
Fall 2003 (#72)
Summer 2003 (#71)
Spring 2003 (#70)

2002

Winter 2002-03 (#69)
Fall 2002 (#68)
Summer 2002 (#67)
Spring 2002 (#66)

2001

Winter 2001 - 02 (#65)
Fall 2001 (#64)
Summer 2001 (#63)
Spring 2001 (#62)

2000

Winter 2000 - 01 (#61)
Fall 2000 (#60)
Summer 2000 (#59)
Spring 2000 (#58)

1999

Winter 1999 - 00 (#57)
Fall 1999 (#56)
Summer 1999 (#55)
Spring 1999 (#54)

 

Image says Accessability - graphic in grey for Access and green for Ability with dove in grey on newpaper that says Extra! Extra! Read all about it.

 

The Two Faces of Cuomo

by Maria Dibble

It has been fascinating, though frustrating, to watch Governor Cuomo’s performances throughout the COVID-19 pandemic crisis in his daily press conferences and in other venues. He is the image of a good leader, concerned about healthcare providers and other essential workers, even to the point of advocating with the federal government for “hazard pay.” (Not offering to have NY provide such pay, mind you, just suggesting the feds do.)

A personality cult has grown up around him in NY and even nationwide. He seems to have become a hero, a knight in shining armor, one who can do no wrong, virtually overnight.

He thanks essential workers profusely for their contributions, for being out on the front line, putting their families and themselves at risk on a daily basis. And who can argue with that? I certainly won’t because I agree with him totally, as I am quite sure all of you do...

Continue reading...

 

Cuomo’s Pro-Nursing “Home” Bias Blows Up in His Face

As we’ve reported elsewhere (see Response to Panic: Lock ‘em Up? Or Let ‘em Die?), nursing facilities and other congregate residential settings have been hit especially hard by COVID-19 all over the US. Gruesome stories of truckloads full of decaying dead bodies in nursing “home” parking lots and frantic relatives, not allowed to visit their loved ones due to social distancing rules, and unable to get information about them because of a mixture of staff shortages and administrative cover-ups, have been reported from several cities.

There are many reasons for this. Most of the people in nursing facilities are elderly, and elderly people are the most likely to die from this disease. Various chronic health conditions, such as diabetes or heart disease, also common in these places, are another risk factor for COVID-19 death. The facilities have notoriously lax infection control practices. Over the past four years, 63% of all nursing “homes” in the US, including 40% of those with five-star quality ratings, were cited for infection control deficiencies, according to Kaiser Health News. Many of the citations were for things that are extremely dangerous now, such as failure to wash hands or wear masks. They also face chronic staff shortages for the same reason the homecare industry does—low wages. Of course, nursing facilities have had the same difficulties getting masks and other “personal protective equipment” (PPE) as have hospitals during the crisis, and many of their own employees have come down with the disease, exacerbating shortages among staff who might otherwise be working to constantly clean and sanitize those places...

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Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Accessibility during the Pandemic

By Heather Shaffer

Since the COVID-19 pandemic began in March, Governor Andrew Cuomo placed himself on television daily. Many people applauded him as the great leader of our beautiful State of New York, a leader who should run for the President of the United States. His daily press briefings have different platforms: televised news, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and they reached not only the people of NY but people all across the US. However, a large group of people in our progressive state were left out of his briefings: people who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing (HOH). There are over 300,000 Deaf/HOH people in New York State. While we are fortunate to have access to technology that provides different approaches to spreading information, we still need access to our language for an effective understanding of what is happening, the daily changes being announced, the implementation of regulations in regard to mask wearing and social distancing, and crucial information that is important for everybody to have and understand...

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Summer 2020 Issue No. 139 - web site version

Summer 2020 Issue No. 139 - pdf version