Newsletter Issues

2019

Winter 2019-20 (#137) pdf
Winter 2019-20 (#137) web
Fall 2019 (#136) pdf
Fall 2019 (#136) web
Summer 2019 (#135) pdf
Summer 2019 (#135) web
Spring 2019 (#134) pdf
Spring 2019 (#134) web

Newsletter Issues

2018

Winter 2018-19 (#133) pdf
Winter 2018-19 (#133) web
Fall 2018 (#132) pdf
Fall 2018 (#132) web
Summer 2018 (#131) pdf
Summer 2018 (#131) web
Spring 2018 (#130) pdf
Spring 2018 (#130) web

2017

Winter 2017-18 (#129) pdf
Winter 2017-18 (#129) web
Fall 2017 (#128) pdf
Fall 2017 (#128) web
Summer 2017(#127) pdf
Summer 2017 (#127) web
Spring 2017 (#126) pdf
Spring 2017 (#126) web

2016

Winter 2016 (#125) pdf
Winter 2016 (#125) web
Fall 2016 (#124) pdf
Fall 2016 (#124) web
Summer 2016 (#123) pdf
Summer 2016 (#123) web
Spring 2016 (#122) pdf
Spring 2016 (#122) web

2015

Winter 2015 (#121) pdf
Winter 2015 (#121) web
Fall 2015 (#120) pdf
Fall 2015 (#120) web
Summer 2015 (#119) pdf
Summer 2015 (#119) web
Spring 2015 (#118) pdf
Spring 2015 (#118) web

2014

Winter 2014 (#117) pdf
Winter 2014 (#117) web
Fall 2014 (#116) pdf
Fall 2014 (#116) web
Summer 2014 (#115) pdf
Summer 2014 (#115) web
Spring 2014 (#114) pdf
Spring 2014 (#114) web

2013

Winter 2013-14 (#113) pdf
Winter 2013-14 (#113) web
Fall 2013 (#112) pdf
Fall 2013 (#112) web
Summer 2013 (#111) pdf
Summer 2013 (#111) web
Spring 2013 (#110) pdf
Spring 2013 (#110) web

2012

Winter 2012 - 13 (#109) pdf
Winter 2012 -13 (#109) web
Fall 2012 (#108) pdf
Fall 2012 (#108) web
Summer 2012 (#107)
Spring 2012 (#106)

2011

Winter 2011 - 12 (#105)
Fall 2011 (#104)
Summer 2011 (#103)
Spring 2011 (#102)

2010

Winter 2010 - 11 (#101)
Fall 2010 (#100)
Summer 2010 (#99)
Spring 2010 (#98)

2009

Winter 2009 - 10 (#97)
Fall 2009 (#96)
Summer 2009 (#95)
Spring 2009 (#94)

2008

Winter 2008 - 09 (#93)
Fall 2008 (#92)
Summer 2008 (#91)
Spring 2008 (#90)

2007

Winter 2007 - 08 (#89)
Fall 2007 (#88)
Summer 2007 (#87)
Spring 2007 (#86)

2006

Winter 2006 - 07 (#85)
Fall 2006 (#84)
Summer 2006 (#83)
Spring 2006 (#82)

2005

Winter 2005 - 06 (#81)
Fall 2005 (#80)
Summer 2005 (#79)
Spring 2005 (#78)

2004

Winter 2004 - 05 (#77)
Fall 2004 (#76)
Summer 2004 (#75)
Spring 2004 (#74)

2003

Winter 2003 - 04 (#73)
Fall 2003 (#72)
Summer 2003 (#71)
Spring 2003 (#70)

2002

Winter 2002-03 (#69)
Fall 2002 (#68)
Summer 2002 (#67)
Spring 2002 (#66)

2001

Winter 2001 - 02 (#65)
Fall 2001 (#64)
Summer 2001 (#63)
Spring 2001 (#62)

2000

Winter 2000 - 01 (#61)
Fall 2000 (#60)
Summer 2000 (#59)
Spring 2000 (#58)

1999

Winter 1999 - 00 (#57)
Fall 1999 (#56)
Summer 1999 (#55)
Spring 1999 (#54)

 

Image says Accessability - graphic in grey for Access and green for Ability with dove in grey on newpaper that says Extra! Extra! Read all about it.

 

NY Medicaid under Attack: The Real Story

by Ken Dibble

There have been a lot of stories in the media this fall about how New York’s Medicaid spending is out of control and there are going to have to be deep cuts. Some of this is driven by people who don’t like government programs, and some is aimed at certain special interests that seem to be getting a windfall out of this increased spending. Most of the coverage, though, ignores or downplays the state’s bias in favor of segregated programs while demonizing people with disabilities, including a growing number of elderly people, who rely on personal care services to remain in their own homes and participate in community life.

The anti-Medicaid charge is being led by the Empire Center for Public Policy, a right-wing think tank that generally opposes social-welfare spending and efforts to level the public-policy playing field so that poor people and people of color have an impact equal to that of the comfortable and the wealthy. For example, they think we wouldn’t need the “Obamacare” Medicaid expansion for the working poor if we would just cut state taxes on insurance companies, because if we did that, surely those companies would kindly lower their premiums and not simply pocket the increased profits, and then people living at or just above the poverty line (up to a maximum annual income of $17,236 for a single person—really high on the hog, eh?) would be able to purchase insurance for themselves. This group has done a pretty good job of getting mainstream media coverage for its positions lately...

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CDPA Wins in Court—For Now

by Sue Hoyt

We reported last time on CDPAANYS v Zucker, the lawsuit filed against the NYS Department of Health (DOH) by STIC and several other Centers for Independent Living that provide CDPA services, along with the Consumer Directed Personal Assistance Association of New York State and some others. On October 11, we scored a great victory when Judge Christina L. Ryba of the New York State Supreme Court for Albany County issued a decision that blocked DOH’s attempt to cut the program’s administrative funding to a level below actual costs. The victory may only be temporary, however.

As we reported, DOH at first agreed to negotiate with us last summer but then stopped talking after we presented a compromise that would have cut costs almost as much as DOH wanted without forcing hundreds of providers out of business...

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Susan Ruff: 2019 David Veatch Advocacy Award Winner

by Maria Dibble

Susan Ruff, STIC’s Advocacy Director, received the David Veatch Advocacy Award from the New York Association on Independent Living (NYAIL) in September. This award is named for a steadfast and dedicated advocate who fought hard for the passage of the Consumer Directed Personal Assistance Program (CDPA) into NYS law in the early 1990s. He was only in his early to mid-twenties at the time, but demonstrated a level of sophistication and strategic abilities usually found in a more seasoned advocate. He passed away before CDPA became law in NY, many believe partly from a lack of sufficient personal care services. This award is special to NYAIL members who remember David as I do, so I was pleased to nominate Sue and see her receive the award.

Sue has been an advocate for disability rights for most of her adult life. She adopted a daughter with Down syndrome, and had to constantly advocate to have her included in regular classrooms, as well as religious, recreational and social activities. She believed in and advocated for inclusion before it ever became a concept on the horizon, and very long before it became a reality in law...

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Winter 2019-2020 Issue No. 137 - web site version

Winter 2019-2020 Issue No. 137 - pdf version