Newsletter Issues

2018

Spring 2018 (#130) pdf
Spring 2018 (#130) web

2017

Winter 2017-18 (#129) pdf
Winter 2017-18 (#129) web
Fall 2017 (#128) pdf
Fall 2017 (#128) web
Summer 2017(#127) pdf
Summer 2017 (#127) web
Spring 2017 (#126) pdf
Spring 2017 (#126) web

2016

Winter 2016 (#125) pdf
Winter 2016 (#125) web
Fall 2016 (#124) pdf
Fall 2016 (#124) web
Summer 2016 (#123) pdf
Summer 2016 (#123) web
Spring 2016 (#122) pdf
Spring 2016 (#122) web

2015

Winter 2015 (#121) pdf
Winter 2015 (#121) web
Fall 2015 (#120) pdf
Fall 2015 (#120) web
Summer 2015 (#119) pdf
Summer 2015 (#119) web
Spring 2015 (#118) pdf
Spring 2015 (#118) web

2014

Winter 2014 (#117) pdf
Winter 2014 (#117) web
Fall 2014 (#116) pdf
Fall 2014 (#116) web
Summer 2014 (#115) pdf
Summer 2014 (#115) web
Spring 2014 (#114) pdf
Spring 2014 (#114) web

2013

Winter 2013-14 (#113) pdf
Winter 2013-14 (#113) web
Fall 2013 (#112) pdf
Fall 2013 (#112) web
Summer 2013 (#111) pdf
Summer 2013 (#111) web
Spring 2013 (#110) pdf
Spring 2013 (#110) web

2012

Winter 2012 - 13 (#109) pdf
Winter 2012 -13 (#109) web
Fall 2012 (#108) pdf
Fall 2012 (#108) web
Summer 2012 (#107)
Spring 2012 (#106)

2011

Winter 2011 - 12 (#105)
Fall 2011 (#104)
Summer 2011 (#103)
Spring 2011 (#102)

2010

Winter 2010 - 11 (#101)
Fall 2010 (#100)
Summer 2010 (#99)
Spring 2010 (#98)

2009

Winter 2009 - 10 (#97)
Fall 2009 (#96)
Summer 2009 (#95)
Spring 2009 (#94)

2008

Winter 2008 - 09 (#93)
Fall 2008 (#92)
Summer 2008 (#91)
Spring 2008 (#90)

2007

Winter 2007 - 08 (#89)
Fall 2007 (#88)
Summer 2007 (#87)
Spring 2007 (#86)

2006

Winter 2006 - 07 (#85)
Fall 2006 (#84)
Summer 2006 (#83)
Spring 2006 (#82)

2005

Winter 2005 - 06 (#81)
Fall 2005 (#80)
Summer 2005 (#79)
Spring 2005 (#78)

2004

Winter 2004 - 05 (#77)
Fall 2004 (#76)
Summer 2004 (#75)
Spring 2004 (#74)

2003

Winter 2003 - 04 (#73)
Fall 2003 (#72)
Summer 2003 (#71)
Spring 2003 (#70)

2002

Winter 2002-03 (#69)
Fall 2002 (#68)
Summer 2002 (#67)
Spring 2002 (#66)

2001

Winter 2001 - 02 (#65)
Fall 2001 (#64)
Summer 2001 (#63)
Spring 2001 (#62)

2000

Winter 2000 - 01 (#61)
Fall 2000 (#60)
Summer 2000 (#59)
Spring 2000 (#58)

1999

Winter 1999 - 00 (#57)
Fall 1999 (#56)
Summer 1999 (#55)
Spring 1999 (#54)

 

Image says Accessability - graphic in grey for Access and green for Ability with dove in grey on newpaper that says Extra! Extra! Read all about it.

 

Broken Promises Lead to Broken Lives, Especially If We Let Them

by Maria Dibble

How many times can Governor Cuomo ignore people with disabilities, break his promises, or introduce detrimental policies and cuts? Let me count the ways!

1. Revival of sheltered workshops.

The state made a formal agreement with federal regulators in 2014 to close sheltered workshops. In 2015 the Governor’s Employment First Commission took plenty of credit for OPWDD’s closure plan and called integrated employment for competitive wages the “preferred alternative” to sheltered workshops. Since then we’ve found, from the people we’ve helped to leave segregated work and living circumstances, that all of them are happier.

2. Refusing to provide a path to a competitive wage for homecare attendants..

Continue reading...

 

Feds Ding NY Medicaid Managed Care

In a report issued in September 2017, the federal Medicaid Inspector General (MIG) heavily criticized the New York State Department of Health (DOH) for failing to oversee the state’s Medicaid Managed Long-Term Care (MLTC) program. As a result, MLTC plans overbilled, failed to provide services, and did not provide real person-centered planning. The report confirms what STIC and other advocates have been saying about managed care for several years.

A few years ago (see AccessAbility Summer 2013), some managed care companies in the New York City area committed wholesale fraud by recruiting elderly people to attend Medicaid-funded day programs with offers of free food and recreation. They enrolled hundreds of them in Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) services. ADHC is a congregate program that provides recreation, meals, and health monitoring, supervision, and services, and it is supposed to only be available to people who have significant disabilities. Most of the enrollees were quite healthy and didn’t need the service, and many were not eligible for the Medicaid-funded program based on their income, or because they also had Medicare. After these crimes were discovered, it occurred to the MIG that other MLTC plans might be doing similar things...

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Employment First Goes Sideways

Although almost nothing has been done to carry out the original recommendations of Governor Cuomo’s Employment First Commission, we were surprised to learn that the Commission seems to have taken a different direction that might actually be better."

In the last year the state has gone from one to four staff dedicated to the Employment First initiative.

They are asking all 254,000 state vendors to hire one person with a disability. The first mailing, including a “Disability Employment Toolkit”, has gone out to 57,000 of them. Employment First will electronically track whether the vendors opened the email or attachment and will follow up with them. They are considering strongly urging vendors to hire people during the first year of the project, and then perhaps making it mandatory if they don’t hire people...

Continue reading...

 

Spring 2018 Issue No. 130 - web site version

Spring 2018 Issue No. 130 - pdf version